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Day of Remembrance

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Celebrating Vashon’s Japanese and agrarian heritage

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DAY OF REMEMBRANCE

Mary and Yoneichi

Mary and Yoneichi Matsuda were evacuated with their parents from Vashon and imprisoned as a result of Executive Order 9066.  They still volunteered to serve in the uniforms of the country that imprisoned them

Join Friends of Mukai on February 19th as we remember and reflect on the 75th Anniversary of the day President Roosevelt signed Executive Order 9066 in 1942, authorizing the exclusion, removal and incarceration of over 120,000 persons of Japanese ancestry. Of those, roughly two-thirds were American-born citizens. One hundred twenty-six Vashon Island residents were removed to the Pinedale Processing Center in California and eventually dispersed to six of the concentration camps. Another four voluntarily relocated before the evacuation.

Executive Order 9066 gave the military broad powers to ban any person of Japanese ancestry from a coastal area stretching from the Canadian border along the Cascade Crest, expanding east at Wenatchee to include the Hanford area, then along the Cascade Crest through Oregon. The area covered all of California to Mexico, then along the border through southern Arizona. The order authorized removing these individuals to temporary assembly centers hastily set up and governed by the military in California, Arizona, Washington and Oregon before placing them in ten concentration camps surrounded by barbed wire and guard towers, located in desolate desert or swampland areas in California, Idaho, Utah, Wyoming, Colorado, Arizona and Arkansas.

As a result of these actions, Japanese Americans lost businesses, homes, and family and community connections. Many were never able to return. In addition to the complete violation of their civil liberties, the wartime treatment of Japanese Americans was extreme and sweeping, uprooting entire communities, tearing apart families, and irrevocably changing lives

Mukai Farm and Garden, 18017 107th Ave. SW,
Sunday, February 19th, from 11:00 a.m. to 1:00 p.m.
with a ceremony including readings, poetry and a candle lighting at noon.


 

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